Types Of Miliaria ( Heat Rash )

Common types of miliaria …

Miliaria, also known as sweat rash is a common skin disease marked by small and itchy rashes. Generally, it looks like dots or tiny pimples. Heat rash is a common ailment available in the hot and humid conditions, such as in the tropics and during the summer season. It affects people of all ages and genders. It is common in babies and children due to their undeveloped sweet glands.

Heat rash is caused by the blockage of the sweat ducts, which results in the leakage of eccrine sweat into the epidermis or dermis. The flows of sweat are obstructed, meaning it stays trapped within the skin, rather than moving from the sweat glands to the surface of the skin.

Types of heat rash :

The types of heat rash are classified according to how deep the blocked sweat ducts are. Signs and symptoms of each type vary. Sometimes broken down into five types, including :

  1. Heat Rash Crystalline – It is the most common form of heat rashes. It affects the sweat ducts in the top layer of your skin. Includes small clear (or white) bumps filled with fluid (sweat) on the surface of the skin. This is more common in babies than adults. In this type of rashes, there are nither itching nor pain.
  2. Heat rash Rubra – It is also known as prickly heat. It is associated with red bumps on the skin, inflammation, itching or prickling and a lack of sweat in the affected area. It is more uncomfortable, due to the deeper layers of the skin.
  3. Heat Rash Profunda – It is a less common form of heat rashes. It affects the dermis, the deepest layer of skin. Retained sweat leaks out of the sweat gland into the skin, causing the firm, flesh-colored lesions that resemble goose bumps. It can recur and become chronic.
  4. Heat Rash Vesicles – It is also known as heat rash pustulosa. In some cases, the fluid-containing sacs of heat rash rubra become inflamed and pus-filled.
  5. Tropical anhidrotic asthenia – This is a rare form of heat rash. It is a long-lasting poral obstacle. It produces anhidrosis and heat retention.

 

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